Aves

A blog dedicated to birds
rhamphotheca:

Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) Family: (Parulidae) Wood-Warblers  A striking small bird of eastern hardwood forests, the Hooded Warbler prefers forests with some shrub understory. The female has no hood or only a hint of a hood. Both sexes often flash their tails, revealing conspicuous white side feathers. They forage in undergrowth, usually no more than 10 feet above the ground. 

Hooded Warblers can currently be seen at Houston Audubon’s High Island and other wooded sanctuaries. The Hooded Warbler is strongly territorial on its wintering grounds. Males and females use different habitats: males in mature forest, and females in scrubbier forest and seasonally flooded areas. If a male is removed, a female in adjacent scrub will not move into the male’s territory. Photograph by Joanne Kamo

(via: Houston Audubon)

rhamphotheca:

Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina)

Family: (Parulidae) Wood-Warblers

A striking small bird of eastern hardwood forests, the Hooded Warbler prefers forests with some shrub understory. The female has no hood or only a hint of a hood. Both sexes often flash their tails, revealing conspicuous white side feathers. They forage in undergrowth, usually no more than 10 feet above the ground.
Hooded Warblers can currently be seen at Houston Audubon’s High Island and other wooded sanctuaries.

The Hooded Warbler is strongly territorial on its wintering grounds. Males and females use different habitats: males in mature forest, and females in scrubbier forest and seasonally flooded areas. If a male is removed, a female in adjacent scrub will not move into the male’s territory.

Photograph by Joanne Kamo